Girl Engineers’ Power: Collaboration with Dumfries Museum, Celebrating the Centenary of the Women’s Engineering Society

Contributing to the Women’s Engineering Society centenary celebrations, we have teamed up with Dumfries Museum to put the exhibition on Dorothée Pullinger. The exhibition celebrating her Scottish connection is on public viewing until end of January 2020.

Dorothée Pullinger was a key member of the Women’s Engineering Society at its inception in 1919. At the time, Pullinger was in the minority as a woman in engineering, making her achievements all the more remarkable.

The exhibition, which is based on archival research, brings Pullinger’s story to life with a collection of artefacts gathered from her career – and hopes to inspire engineers of the future. As well as drawing on Pullinger’s success, the exhibition shares stories of ‘anonymous’ female engineers, attributing names to those who took up training positions with the Galloway Engineering Company at Tongland, near Kirkcubright.

Dumfries Museum has a programme of events to tie in with the exhibition, including a talk on Pullinger and the Galloway car by one of our research team’s member, engineering historian Dr Nina Baker. There is also a series of family-friendly drop-in sessions where visitors can make a pop-up Galloway motor car picture, and design a car for the future. Find out more about the exhibition, and museum opening times, at www.dgculture.co.uk.Contributing to the Women’s Engineering Society centenary celebrations, we have teamed up with Dumfries Museum to put the exhibition on Dorothée Pullinger. The exhibition celebrating her Scottish connection is on public viewing until end of January 2020.

Dorothée Pullinger was a key member of the Women’s Engineering Society at its inception in 1919. At the time, Pullinger was in the minority as a woman in engineering, making her achievements all the more remarkable.

The exhibition, which is based on archival research, brings Pullinger’s story to life with a collection of artefacts gathered from her career – and hopes to inspire engineers of the future. As well as drawing on Pullinger’s success, the exhibition shares stories of ‘anonymous’ female engineers, attributing names to those who took up training positions with the Galloway Engineering Company at Tongland, near Kirkcubright.

Dumfries Museum has a programme of events to tie in with the exhibition, including a talk on Pullinger and the Galloway car by one of our research team’s member, engineering historian Dr Nina Baker. There is also a series of family-friendly drop-in sessions where visitors can make a pop-up Galloway motor car picture, and design a car for the future. Find out more about the exhibition, and museum opening times, at www.dgculture.co.uk.

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